The facilities

A large doorway leads visitors into the building, whose structure is developed around the courtyard. The rooms, in the section on the left of the courtyard, have star vaulted ceilings, while they are mainly barrel vaulted on the main floor, on the right. On the floors, one can also recognise the old Apulian “battuto”.   On the left, the Patio proposes a spacious two-room flat with a star vaulted double bedroom, a bathroom and a living and dining room with a sofa bed. Nearby, opposite to the street door, there is the ground floor kitchen, from which there is also access to the laundry and a bathroom. On the right, a broad stone staircase leads to the Tower, the main floor. You accede to it from a welcoming terrace, through a great door whose cornice is decorated in Lecce stone finely engraved with the mask of the devil. The large rooms are barrel-vaulted, five and a half metres high (the oldest from the 1600s).   A ramp leads to the first floor, The Terraces: here there is a mini-apartment with a star vaulted double bedroom (plus private bathroom) from which you also have access to the roof top terrace.   The building also has a vast multifunctional studio (with additional direct access from via Ramis 13) with connecting large underground cistern accessible by a spiral staircase. It is currently proposed to use this room as a multi-purpose studio for cultural activities, exhibitions, workshops, applied arts workshops, yoga practice, and any other group activity etc.   Children allowed, of course. And even small animals. Smoking is permitted outside the premises, in the courtyard and on the terraces. All rooms feature a Wi-Fi connection and an independent air conditioning unit (cooling and heating).   You can view the plan
 

The Restoration

The restoration, carried out in 2011-2013 by Leopizzi 1750 of Parabita (a family company that has worked for twelve generations in the construction and restoration of churches and monuments), followed rigorous philological and conservational criteria. Architect: Corrado Cazzato of Presicce. This has led to the decision to preserve the typical architectural elements: the vaulting, the materials with the use of local stone (carparo and Lecce stone), the layout and the original walls.
 

Furniture and furnishings

High-quality furniture and furnishings mostly go back to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Some come from Friuli (North-East Italy); among them we note the early nineteenth-century Specchiera consolle impero (console dressing table) in the reception- and-kitchen room of the Tower. This piece, which comes from the great hall of the Pitotti family home (now Antiquarium) in Povoletto (Udine), has survived the two world wars in which the house was requisitioned by the local command of the occupation troops avoiding the fate of other furniture and furnishings, burned in the fires repeatedly lit to keep warm. There are two important original engravings, both from the eighteenth century: the first is a map of the Kingdom of Naples where the town of Parabita can also be recognised, while the second is a map of the Republic of Venice. With the help of the owners, it is possible to retrace the origin of various pieces of furniture through the events of family life.  

The garage

Palazzo del Diavolo owns – about 180 metres way – a garage space in via Impero, 76 of about 55 square metres, renovated in 2014, suitable for two compact cars (the entrance door is 192 cm wide).

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